Apollo and the Chimney-Sweeper

HOLY DAY | Uri Gershuni

A5 magazine, Issue no. 6, Sex, 2008

Local Testimony | Exhibition catalog | 2013

Dofek Mekomi

Hilun Ha'Kodesh

Winners 2012

Uri Gershuni and Shay Zilberman: ‘Eye Contact’ | Exhibition catalog | Inga Gallery, Tel Aviv, 2012

Yesterday's Sun

Living Room | Exhibition Catalogue, Tel-Aviv Museum, 2010 | 5 Photographers, 10 Years After

Hamidrasha Magazine

Day and Night

Cocks Achilles

Cockeye: Male Nude in Contemporary Israeli Art

A5 magazine, Issue no. 4, Portrait, 2008

Boys Craft

Click-Clack

Eventually We'll Die

Kink Magazine

The Homes of Others

Sweet 16

Marshim

Mono.Kultur Magazine

After

Men

Rose c'est la Vie

Behind Closed Doors

Hamidrasha Magazine | Issue no. 4, 2001

The Blue Hour | Artist Book, 2014

2014

Uri Gershuni
The Blue Hour
The Green Box, Berlin 2014

“In the blue hour, Uri Gershuni wanders through the English village of Lacock, in the rural county of Wiltshire, which was home in the nineteenth century to the inventor of photography William Henry Fox Talbot, a countryside gentleman and  pioneer of photography. […]
Gershuni’s trip to the village is not a first trip, nor indeed is it properly described as a trip. First, this is not Gershuni’s first visit to Lacock, but a return visit. He first visited the village three years ago in search of the origins of photography. This time Uri Gershuni finds a mode of movement in his non-movement, and this possibility, it turns out, opens up before him when he sits facing the computer screen, through which he may once again visit the village, at least virtually. […]
Google Maps: a single stroke of the keyboard produces a map of the village; drag Pegman over from the left-hand corner into the map, and you’re there, in Street View, on the road leading into the village, tailing a speeding white car; then the road
clears, someone is running by the side of the road, there are tall trees, you pass the runner, you can look up at the tree tops[…]”

Excerpts from Hagi Kenaan’s text, which accompanies the work.

The Blue Hour describes a journey in 255 images not only through Talbot’s village, but also into the depths and layers of photographic language. The images taken from Google Street View, turned black&white, are arranged neatly one image per page. This classical display creates a contrast to the photographies which exhibit all traces of their technical creation and contributes to the book’s ageless look-and-feel.

260 pages
255 illustrations
226 x 170 mm
Hardcover
English
Design: Gila Kaplan
The Green Box, Berlin 2014
ISBN 978-3-941644-72-4

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