Awry, prints

Awry, sculptures

56 Levanda

2014
The exhibition “56 Levanda” presents a sculptural environment layered with sound. At the center of the gallery lies a broken balcony – an exact copy of part of a floor in the Ship House on 56 Levanda street, which overlooks La Guardia junction at the north-east corner of Tel Aviv’s Neve Sha’anan neighborhood. The building is considered to be one of the 4,000 International Style Bauhaus houses built in the city.
Sigal Primor, 56 Levanda, 2014, Chelouche Gallery installation view (1).

The exhibition “56 Levanda” presents a sculptural environment layered with sound. At the center of the gallery lies a broken balcony – an exact copy of part of a floor in the Ship House on 56 Levanda street, which overlooks La Guardia junction at the north-east corner of Tel Aviv’s Neve Sha’anan neighborhood. The building is considered to be one of the 4,000 International Style Bauhaus houses built in the city. The contrast between the utopian aspiration of the Bauhaus and its embodiment in the local Levant and in Tel Aviv’s southern neighborhoods can be read as a departure point for the exhibition. The architectonic fragment, which seems to have fallen or crashed into the gallery space, is entirely covered with steel wool. It comprises two inextricably linked layers. The first is a grid of distorted objects which spreads over the entire exhibition space. It features various felt-covered objects that have undergone a deformation. They include a metal bed, chairs, a stool, bottles and flip flops, mirrors, high-heel shoes, a bucket and so on. The distorted objects scattered in the space emit a continuous beat. This is the show’s second, sonic layer, which plays “Mikrophonie 1”, written by the avant-garde composer Karlheinz Stockhausen in 1964. The artist presents a complex visual/aural web of relations that reveal a radical, concrete and demanding pluralism. While wallowing in the false aspiration of the Bauhaus, the piece evokes the silencing of the voices of the southern neighborhoods, which is amplified into a multiplicity of human and non-human sounds.

The exhibition is accompanied by a text written by Noam Segal. (English | Hebrew)

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