1992-1993

Vitrines

Specimen Cases

Machines

Fields

Dioramas

Carcasses

Dendroids

2008-2011
Distillation is a study of how informational, biological, industrial, anatomical, and mycological systems are processed into what is understood as knowledge. It is a colliding and interweaving of these systems as represented by their distinct dendritic structures. It is a meditation on ‘mystical industrialism’, as well as a visual analogue for the mental processes involved in an idea becoming a physical reality.
Roxy Paine, Distillation, 2010, stainless steel, glass, rubber, oil paint, sulphur, pigment, 5.46X13.7X11.9 meter.

Distillation, 2010

Distillation is a study of how informational, biological, industrial, anatomical, and mycological systems are processed into what is understood as knowledge. It is a colliding and interweaving of these systems as represented by their distinct dendritic structures. It is a meditation on ‘mystical industrialism’, as well as a visual analogue for the mental processes involved in an idea becoming a physical reality.

Inversion, 2008, 2011

Inversion was originally created for the Public Art Projects for Art Basel 39, Basel, Switzerland 2008 and then exhibited at Den Haag Sculptuur 2008, The Hague. Inversion is the first of the Dendroids exploring reverse structural and natural growth patterns as both an engineering and a conceptual challenge. The entire weight of the massive stainless steel sculpture rests on the smallest of its branches. It can be read as being emblematic of, and a monument to, humanity’s incessant desire to alter the natural world. The Israel Museum, Jerusalem acquired Inversion in 2011 where it is permanently installed in the Billy Rose Sculpture Garden.

Maelstrom, 2009

Maelstrom was originally commissioned for exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Iris B. and Gerald Cantor Roof Garden, New York, NY in 2009. Maelstrom is a sculpture whose forms evoke a forest that has been downed by some unseen powerful force, or perhaps that force itself. It also can be seen as a mental storm characterized by a tangle of synaptic connections or a hyperactive mutated robotic vascular system.

One Hundred Foot Line, 2010

Located on the historic Napean Point and overlooking the Ottawa River, One Hundred Foot Line first began as the most controversial sculpture in the Dendroid series, to then after installation and viewing, becoming a widely praised public monument in the city. With its soaring height, One Hundred Foot Line can be viewed from many locations throughout the city as a point of reference to the National Gallery of Canada designed by architect Moshe Safdie. A most significant piece in the trajectory of the Dendroid series, One Hundred Foot Line is the contrary collision between utilitarianism and the sublime, whilst also representing a distilling of the Dendritic form into its (seemingly) simplest manifestation.

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